Spelt bread recipe

This is the recipe that I use at home for spelt bread, I think you will like how it comes out. The trick with spelt is not to overknead it. When using wheat flour it is almost impossible to knead "too long", but with spelt flour if you knead too long your finished loaved will come out heavy and crumbly. Remember to add the flour gradually and only use enough that you don't actually stick to everything as you knead. I usually add the last cup or so a bit at a time so I can stop when I think the dough has enough flour.
Hope you like it!

Blessings,
Lorrie
Lorrie@TLCLimited.com

Spelt Bread — by Rebecca Wood
Yield: Two 8 ½" x 4 ½" loaves

For a lighter flavor and texture, use up to 50% white spelt flour. Some people who are sensitive to common wheat are able to enjoy spelt bread.

Note: it is important that you don't over-knead spelt dough.

1 tablespoon active dry yeast
2 cups warm water (105° to 110° F)
3 tablespoons honey
3 tablespoons melted butter
2 teaspoons sea salt
6 cups spelt flour (use any combination of whole or white spelt)

Combine the yeast, water and honey in a large warm bowl. Let stand for 10 minutes or until the yeast softens. Stir in the butter and salt and 3 cups of the flour. Stir vigorously with a wooden spoon. Add the remaining flour in increments until the dough becomes too stiff to stir, then place the dough on a lightly floured surface. Knead for about 6 minutes, adding any remaining flour as necessary, until the dough becomes smooth and elastic. Do not overknead.

Place the dough in a lightly greased bowl. Cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free spot for about 2 hours or until doubled in bulk.

Grease two 8 ½" x 4 ½" loaf pans. Punch the dough down to deflate it and divide it in half. Form each half into a smooth loaf and place in a prepared pan. Cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free spot for about 1 hour or until the dough has risen to the top of the pans.

Preheat the oven to 350° F.

Uncover the risen loaves. Place the pans on a heavy baking sheet and bake for 45 minutes or until the tops are light brown and crusty. Remove from the oven and tap out of the pan into the baking sheet. Turn the oven off and return the breads to the oven to crisp for 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool on a wire rack.

[Lynn adds: You might want to check out Beautiful Bread Baking with Spelt: Natures Healthy Alternative for more great recipes.]

Forum: 
Anhata's picture

I will try this recipe soon, just need to get more spelt flour.

I found a fabulous recipe for spelt pie dough. I actually used the pie dough recipe with some baking soda added and made homemade crackers with it for our chili, but in eating the crackers I could tell that it would make a perfectly decent pie dough. I'll make some pear mincemeat pies soon with it.

It was very easy to make and even easier to roll out. I'll try it with white spelt flour next time and see how that is.

Anhata
www.familynaturally.com
Your Family's General Store, Naturally

Geri's picture

Hi...I was just wondering if you have ever tried making this in a bread machine?

Guest's picture

We used all white spelt flour, since that was the only local flour our store had. The result - two light fluffy loaves - hooray! Thanks for the great recipe.

Esther's picture

I would like to make splet flour sourdough bread, no yeast please. Do you have a reciepe

Grace's picture

Thank you and I will try the recipe!!

Guest's picture

i have used this reciepe many times. I love it and the breat comes out great. I like to add a 1/3 of a cup flax meal.

Guest's picture

Bread machines are for wheat bread and will over knead the bread. If you want to use a bread machine I recommend using one that has a gluten free cycle and it will not over knead the dough.

Guest's picture

Spelt has gluten. Why would you use a gluten free cycle? Spelt is an ancient wheat!
I've made spelt bread in my bread machine and I used the whole wheat cycle. Came out good!

Guest's picture

[quote=Guest]Spelt has gluten. Why would you use a gluten free cycle? Spelt is an ancient wheat!
I've made spelt bread in my bread machine and I used the whole wheat cycle. Came out good![/quote]

Yes, spelt has gluten but what a lot of people don't know is that it is not the gluten that celiacs need to avoid; it's the GLIADIN in the gluten. The gluten in spelt has NO gliadin. That's why people with intolerance to wheat can eat spelt... EXCEPT when the spelt has been contaminated by machinery that has been used to manufacture wheat. In the future, you will begin to see this information become more widely available.

Guest's picture

I am gluten-intolerant (probably celiac) and CANNOT tolerate spelt. I will try this recipe for my husband, though.

Guest's picture

I am new to baking bread and also to spelt. My 2.5 year old son and 1 year old daughter, and I followed the recipe, though we exchanged coconut oil for butter because of their whey allergy, and the bread turned out great! They also do not do well with wheat so we'll see if the spelt is any better for them. The recipe was easy to follow and everything happened just like it said that it would. We all had a great time preparing, baking and eating this bread. My husband was even impressed. (I think I'm going to have to add more honey to get him hooked though:) ). Thanks!

Madeline Windel's picture

I am interested in how this turned out for you! Did your children do better with spelt than with wheat?

erikab 's picture

My 3.5 yr old and I both do not tolerate wheat well. I have made sourdough spelt (whole grain) bread since he was less than a year old and he does great with it! We do eat it in moderation, though. The most obvious reaction he has to wheat (and corn and soy) is eczema. We use brown rice substitutes for things like pasta so that he does not have too much spelt since it does have some gluten. I do not care for non gluten breads as they taste like cardboard and often have corn or soy in them, both of which we cannot eat. Today we will try this recipe since my spelt sourdough starter went bad. BTW, for those of you wanting to make sourdough spelt bread, i have successfully used recipes for wheat sourdough bread with slight modifications of how much flour to use. I always use 100% whole grain spelt.

Guest's picture

Hi, the yeast I is dry and is meant to be mixed into the dry ingredients and then given only one rise. Do you think this will make a difference to the recipe? Thanks for the recipe.

daniel C's picture

i gave it a try with 4 cups spelt and 2 cups wholewheat (i was out of spelt) and it came great.
so simple and so tasty

thank you,
Daniel

80sGirl's picture

Sounds interesting. I will give it a try!

Guest's picture

Hi there. Does anyone have a good recipe for spelt buscuits? I've tried using a regular white/wheat flour buscuit recipe and just substituting the spelt for the wheat but it comes out horrible.

Guest's picture

1 cup whole wheat spelt flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 Tbsp baking powder
2 Tbsp shortening (butter will make a bland texture)
1/2 cup milk (or half&half or cream)

make like biscuits, cook for ~13 minutes at 450 F.

You'll notice this makes a very wet dough, so the key is to fold it in half after flattening it out over a floured surface until it has the perfect amout of flour in it. It's much better than wheat because spelt tastes so good, and gluten doesn't form as easily.

erikab 's picture

We use spelt as a substitute for wheat in everything from cakes, pie crust, pizza dough, bread, brownies, cookies, etc. I mostly use it as a direct substitue and have not had to make many modifications other than sometimes adjusting for the dryness of spelt.wol Pizza dough is harder to handle, but it makes great crust!

chante's picture

Loved this recipe! Used whole spelt, and it turned out great. Thanks for sharing!

Bernie's picture

True to form, I discovered this recipe as I sit waiting for the bread to rise. I could not find a spelt recipe in any of the bread books I have and so I thought I'd wing it. I'm afraid I may have a disaster waiting for me, but here goes:

2 cups of oatmeal flour
2 cups of spelt flour, (it's yellow-whatever that means)
1/2 cup of vital gluten flour (I'm not allergic to flour products, unless having a total weakness for home made, baked bread is an allergy. Then I'm in a hopeless condition);
1 1/2 cups of self-rising wheat flour;
2 tsps of coarse salt;
1/2 cup of dried milk, no allergy there, either;
1/3 cup of raw sesame seeds;
1 1/2 cup of water
1/2 cup of milk (while kneading in my Hobart mixer, the flour mixture seemed dry)
1 egg added to the flour while kneading because it still seemed too dry);
1 tbs canola oil;
2 tbs of butter
2 tsps of sugar (just knew I should have used some honey, but hey I'm new at this....)

blended all the flours together and sifted into a large bowl;
put the yeast in 1/2 cup of warm water w/ the sugar to "proof" it;
added the butter to the dry milk and 1 cup of water and microwaved it till the butter was melted, but not hot;
poured water, milk, butter mix into the flour and started kneading, then dumped the yeast water mix into the flour;
added 1/3 cup of milk to the yeast cup to make sure I got all of the yeast into the flour mix;
kneading for about 4 minutes, rested, kneaded for another 3 or 4 minutes (wasn't really timing this, just trying to judge when it looked like a ball of bread dough with nice elasticity;
lightly floured a kneading mat and kneaded by hand for a minute or so;
tossed on the sesame seeds and kneaded some more by hand then decided to knead in the mixer for a minute, or so;
greased a mixing bowl w/ Crisco to coat the dough ball and set inside my oven w/ a towel over it;
decided to turn on the oven for a few minutes to warm it lightly, then turned off the oven;
added a frying pan with really hot tap water and set in the warmed oven.

(I'm thinking it will take a long time to rise since I didn't add sugar or honey to feed the yeast....that's what scares me most w/ this seat of the pants approach.)

There it sits and I'm hoping it will be edible or at least taste good with the soup I made earlier today (no problem there)

I'll let everyone know in a couple of hours......keep your fingers crossed.

Bernie in Tulsa

Al's picture

I kneaded a 50/50 whole spelt and white spelt for about 7 minutes
with a dough hook at low speed. Everything looked fine baking began. The loaves went from convex to concave. Any suggestions?

Guest's picture

For the last person:

Spelt does have gluten, but it is not as robust as conventional wheat's gluten and does not require vigorous kneading. In fact, that will destroy the gluten in spelt!
I have seen some spelt bread recipes in which you do not knead at all. Just stir together until homogeneous. This will guarantee that the loaves do not fall.

Another reason it fell could be that your yeast was old/not active. Try proofing it first to make sure.

Guest's picture

[quote=Guest]For the last person:

Spelt does have gluten, but it is not as robust as conventional wheat's gluten and does not require vigorous kneading. In fact, that will destroy the gluten in spelt!
I have seen some spelt bread recipes in which you do not knead at all. Just stir together until homogeneous. This will guarantee that the loaves do not fall.

Another reason it fell could be that your yeast was old/not active. Try proofing it first to make sure.[/quote]

Yes, spelt has gluten but what a lot of people don't know is that it is not the gluten that celiacs need to avoid; it's the GLIADIN in the gluten. The gluten in spelt has NO gliadin. That's why people with intolerance to wheat can eat spelt... EXCEPT when the spelt has been contaminated by machinery that has been used to manufacture wheat. In the future, you will begin to see this information become more widely available.

Amy Venman's picture

I've made it twice since discovering it, and I'm so happy with it! Since I'm baking for one, I froze one loaf while eating my way through the other, and found that it didn't lose quality. Yay!

Rita S's picture

:grin: Thank you so much for this delicious recipe. It's the nicest bread I've ever made or tasted. You're a star!

Rita - New Zealand

Rebecca (Blissfully Vegan)'s picture

This sounds great, and so simple! I'm definitely going to give it a go, substituting Olive Oil and Maple Syrup for the Butter & Honey...I have a huge Bread Cookbook, but the Spelt recipes always incorporate Wheat Flour too, so i'm very excited to try this one! I might pop it in my Bread Machine, but will use the Gluten Free setting as someone above mentioned...Thanks!

Guest's picture

Hi, y'all,
Don't know if you know but Canola oil is a light industrial oil that someone fiddled with and said, "Hey, we can eat this!"
You should all look it up on the net and see for yourself what people think. Personally I will only use sunflower oil or similar but NEVER Canola.
Have fun :)
Jay

Julia's picture

:grin: Cant wait to try this recipe I have been playing with my mom's famous white bread recipe and brown rice flour and gotten a couple good loafs but wanted to try spelt and doing some basic research first. My husband and I both suffer from adhd and neither of us like taking medicine if we can help it so I have been slowly incorperating on whole foods and deleting any man/lab created foods we eat. That included cuting out white and normal wheat flour. Mostly because I have been doing research on to alternate/cheaper ways for us to calm us down. It has been hard for him to adjust to dense bread so trying spelt.

Flatten's picture

:( I made this bread and it looked to be going really well until I put it in the oven. It raised up well and was level with the top of the bread pan when I put it in the oven and it stayed that way. It didn't raise and round up on the top....what did I do wrong?

MB's picture

:? I halved this recipe since I only have one bread pan and only wanted one loaf. I don't know if that made a difference. The only other way I went off-recipe was that I didn't knead it for 6 minutes. I think I kneaded only about 3 minutes, but I DID knead until the dough was smooth and elastic. It rose how it should and it rose to the top of the pan on the second rising, but when I took it out of the oven after about 40 minutes, it had flattened out considerably. At the high point the loaf is maybe 4 inches high. What did I do wrong? :(

Love Baking's picture

I have started paying attention to eating foods with high density micronutrients, so I made this spelt bread with amaranth to increase the protein level. I was pleased with the outcome, but I did double the time of the second rising and the dough rose to almost the top. It did not rise any more while baking. It does produce a dense loaf, but the texture is very good and great for toast. Next time I will double the amount of yeast.

Guest's picture

I below to a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) group and we never know what we are getting in the grocery bag until the day before delivery. I received some locally grown/ground spelt flour and wasn't sure what to do with it. I am SO glad I chose this recipe to use the flour. The bread is delicious and I can't wait until I get more spelt flour in my CSA bag. Thanks for a great recipe!

Guest's picture

i'm used to making a whole wheat recipe in my bosch that makes 6 loaves. do you think i could triple this recipe & make in my bosch? thanks for providing this recipe; i'm excited to try it!

Guest's picture

I used all whole spelt. My loaves never reached the top of the pans, and they look rather like bricks when done. Still, they taste fine and slice neatly. I didn't get all the flour into it--maybe 5 1/4 cups.

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